New Figurative sculpture course! April 2020

A 5-week online course April 22nd – May 22nd 2020

– where you will learn how to make a large contemplative sculpture using a wet felt method of sculpting.

These sculptures are inspired by the work of modern sculptors, such as Barbara Hepworth and Sir Henry Moore and others. You will have the opportunity to explore the work of these sculptors and, through a series of drawing exercises, create your own shapes.

The finished figure will measure about 16″/40cm – 20″/50cm in height, dependent on the shape and position.

This is an energetic process that involves manual shaping and felting, plus a sander and steamer to finish.

COURSE TIMETABLE

April 22nd – Welcome

April 24th – Week 1 An introduction to Sculpture

May 1st –  Week 2 The Skeleton

May 8th –  Week 3 The Musculature Part 1

May 15th – Week 4 The Musculature Part 2

May 22nd – Week 5 The Skin and Finishing

ABOUT THE ONLINE CLASSROOM.

The Course is hosted by RUZUKU

Each weekly lesson is comprised of a range of activities to show you how to build your sculpture step-by-step. There are video instructions, text and images and downloadable worksheets for each activity.

Online teaching materials and resources are available to students for 6 months from the beginning of the class. The downloadable course material and PDF’s are yours forever.

Online Felt Workshops Molly Williams

There is an online course Discussion Forum where you can chat to me and fellow students, post comments and images and ask questions. I will respond to all comments and questions during the length of the course and while the online classroom is open – I am mindful that there is a lot of work to do and it may take some of you a little longer than the 5 weeks.  As you will have full access to the videos, online class materials and Discussion Forum for 6 months, there will be plenty to time to work at your own pace.

You will learn a truly new and unique process!

Join me to learn how to make your own beautiful sculpture….

 

 

Creating an online course

I’ve been designing an online course for several months and it is finally published and I have lovely, talented students from several parts of the world working through it.

It has been a BIG learning journey for me and one I have really enjoyed.

There has been much to figure out when it comes to:

  • Setting up my studio

Small desk set up for close work

  • Lighting
  • Videoing
  • Recording and editing
  • Audio presentations
  • Screen shots and video
  • AND First – finding the right Online Platform for me!

Large table set up

So….. I thought I would write a course about how I went about setting up mine and how I got round the problems I encountered along the way.

A point though – all the online course platform sites have their own excellent, and free, courses on ‘How to create your online course’. These are very good and will get you on your way. However there were lots of things I had to figure for myself…..

….for example:

When I filmed my first videos, on my iPhone, I could not see what I was filming – hence very often my hands migrated off the screen mid-demonstration! I discovered Mirroring Apps that let me view my video, on my Mac screen, while the iPhone did the actual filming – I could literally keep an eye on what I was doing! Eureka moment!

I’m hoping this course will help others, especially non-techie artists and craftsmen like me, to create their own online workshops and teach the world their amazing skills.

Would value some feedback!

I’ll post my views about the Course Platforms I have researched..

 

My 30 Day Challenge 2019

A 30 Day creative challenge for myself starting Friday 31st May 2019.

  1. Create a new piece of art every day
  2. 30 minutes minimum
  3. Drawing, painting, sculpture
  4. Try new materials – recycled, acrylic and oil paint, fabrics, wood, metal, concrete, paverpol, plaster, collage, 2D and 3D.
  5. Log daily with images and text
  6. Daily instagram and FB

Day 1- 31 May

Decorative felt for a bag.

Added a lot of fabric and wool and then finished with free machine embroidery – this was for a bag however the felt was too thick to attach to the purse fixing and will use it to make a pouch bag with a clip closure.

Experimental ceramic figures

I have been developing a way of creating sculptures with a clay and textile mix on a wire frame.

The figures (usually felted) are changing in response to the theme of ‘Fragility’ for the Prism Textiles Exhibition at Hoxton Arches gallery, London next month.

 

There is nothing the least fragile about my felt sculptures that go through a very vigorous, wet felt process. By creating a ceramic sculpture I have introduced an element of fragility to the form – or that is my intention!

 

 

The process thus far:

The figures have a twisted wire skeleton – 2mm and 2.5mm to reinforce the standing leg.

I made a paper clay slip with stoneware clay, paper and water and used this to soak ribbons of cut knitted woollen fabric to bind around the wires – then left to dry.

I repeated this process with the same material to shape the arms and the hips and legs. The torso was formed with solid clay to add a textural contrast.

Once dry I polished the torso clay to bring it up to a smooth shine – but only possible in places so not very sucessful!

Firing the figures

I have placed the figures in a foil ‘saggar’ with a range of colouring materials.

Materials:

  • Seaweed powder (spirulaena)
  • wire wool rusted
  • copper wire
  • banana skins
  • salt

I wrapped fine wire wool and banana skins around the figure securing them with copper wire. Spirulaena and salt was sprinkled on last and wrapped the whole in layers of foil.

Figure wrapped in foil

 

Then out to the yard and my steel bin!

I put a good 30cm of sawdust in the bottom of the bin and lined the sides with wood. I then placed two foil parcels of figures onto the sawdust base. Long ribbons of fabric soaked in white spirit were tucked into the this layer and then filled the rest of the bin with smallish pieces of wood. Finally I pushed more spirit-soaked fabric through the four vent holes, into the layer of sawdust, at the bottom of the bin.

I lit the kiln from the base of the bin – lighting the four fabric ribbons.

Once the fire was really going – about 8-10 minutes – I closed the vents with fire proof fabric kept in place with bricks.

Finally, once I was sure the fire was hot and fierce, I put the lid over the flames and there it stayed for 18 hours (over night).

Link to Raku firing

The materials have added plenty of colour to the figure and happily there are no cracks in the clay!

My final task is to find a suitable base in which to set the figures!

Question – do I add a wire head dress? Gold leaf to highlight? Lacquer? Hmmmm……

 

 

 

Prism 2018 Hoxton Arches Gallery

One of the best Prism exhibitions!

‘TRANSIENT’

A selection of artworks from the exhibition

My submissions

Life dance

Comprised of 28 small figurative felt sculptures.

I use the wet felt method to create these little figures

Exploring the Senses

Two large figurative sculptures suspended

Both pieces together in the gallery

My art work is for sale and I also welcome commissions.

Please contact me for further information.

Molly

Fabric dyeing project

I have never used procion dyes before and have decided to dye and print my fabric for a range of jackets with an Asian ottoman theme.

Researching I have found some good tips for using dyes thickened with sodium alginate to paint or print onto fabric by Alyson Provax

Alyson Provax – printmaker and experimental dyer in Portland, Oregon. Her prints are available through Uprise Art, and her work will be shown in Variable States: Prints Now at Upfor Gallery in Portland this spring. Find her at alysonprovax.com

Pattern design – thoughts

  • Lino cut printing
  • Free hand painting
  • Flowers – tulips, roses, hyacinths, carnations pomegranates
  • Blues and turquoise, maroon, purple and gold, orange and serene greens

 

  • Free machine embroidery
  • Simple jacket design – no darts or extra seams
  • Loose fitting, comfortable, elegant, individual, colourful, excellent

Materials and equipment

  • Procion dyes
  • Urea
  • Soda ash
  • Sodium alginate
  • Mask and gloves
  • Buckets and plastic jugs, spoons and cups, wooden spoon, lots of towels and cardboard to work on
  • Lino cuts, paint brushes
  • Fabrics: Cotton/viscose Ottoman rib Siberia natural, Barkweave cotton, Linen/cotton Manetti (Whaleys of Bradford)

Everything is ordered and will be ready to go by next week – watch this space…..

 

 

19th century Ottoman entari

This beautiful Ottoman entari is in the archives of the Clothworkers Centre, London and I had the chance to examine it closely and to make notes about its size and construction.

The main fabric appears to be of cotton with stripes of soft yellow motifs and darker black floral motifs woven into the fabric on a cream background, further embellished with hand embroidered chain stitch flower and leaf motifs in several shades of green, blue, soft brown and pink/red.

 

The lining is a deep blue fabric with a woven floral pattern

Scalloped edges are embellished with a gold coloured braiding

Garment measurements:

The sleeves are over long and shaped beautifully towards the cuff

Neck line detail – a scalloped edge and no buttons or evidence of closure

Finishing – to finish the edges of the entari I could see that the top striped fabric was hemmed at the edges – turned in together with the blue lining and hand stitched. The braiding was then stitched along the edges of the top fabric. I could not see any facings or interlinings.

 

Braiding is attached to the top striped fabric along the scalloped edge:

The Clothworkers Centre, London