How to make an Art or Craft online course …the things they don’t teach you!!

£25.00 – Open access

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This is the course I wish I had found before I started making my first online course. 

It is for creatives like me – artists, designers and crafts people who would like to teach their practical skills to the world through video demonstrations. 

When making my first course I spent a lot of time finding out about equipment, lighting, filming and editing. 

In this course I have tried to highlight and answer some of the practical problems I encountered on my course building journey, so that you can get on with making your course. 

However, it is not a ‘how to design, plan, make and sell’ course! There are plenty of those out there and all the online course platforms provide their teachers with excellent, free ‘How to’ courses. 

This course includes information video, images and text and downloadable worksheets. 

The course is hosted on Ruzuku.

So if you would like some useful setup advice – signup! 

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19th century Ottoman entari

This beautiful Ottoman entari is in the archives of the Clothworkers Centre, London and I had the chance to examine it closely and to make notes about its size and construction.

The main fabric appears to be of cotton with stripes of soft yellow motifs and darker black floral motifs woven into the fabric on a cream background, further embellished with hand embroidered chain stitch flower and leaf motifs in several shades of green, blue, soft brown and pink/red.

 

The lining is a deep blue fabric with a woven floral pattern

Scalloped edges are embellished with a gold coloured braiding

Garment measurements:

The sleeves are over long and shaped beautifully towards the cuff

Neck line detail – a scalloped edge and no buttons or evidence of closure

Finishing – to finish the edges of the entari I could see that the top striped fabric was hemmed at the edges – turned in together with the blue lining and hand stitched. The braiding was then stitched along the edges of the top fabric. I could not see any facings or interlinings.

 

Braiding is attached to the top striped fabric along the scalloped edge:

The Clothworkers Centre, London